A brother to the leader of the proscribed Indigenous People of Biafra, Nnamdi Kanu, has revealed how they spoke while he was in Kenya shortly before “he went missing.”

The brother, Kingsley Kanu, disclosed that the detainee had taken a walk when he was arrested and that he was without his documents.

“His UK passport remains in Kenya,” The UK Guardian declared.

According to The Guardian, Kanu’s brother, Kingsley, said he had spoken with him while he was in Kenya, “days before he went missing in June.”

“I spoke to him on the phone, he was well, in Nairobi. His associates said he went out, he didn’t take his documents with him; so he wasn’t planning on going anywhere. Then, all of a sudden, we see him paraded in handcuffs in Abuja,” Kingsley said.

“It is an extraordinary rendition, aided by Kenyan authorities,” he said. “It is an outrage that cannot be allowed to happen.

“We are holding the Nigerian government and Kenyan government responsible. The British government, they know what is happening,” he said, adding that UK officials had made contact with Kanu’s family and legal team and that there were concerns he would be abused in detention.

“I am concerned for his wellbeing because you know how they will treat him,” Kingsley said.

Lawyers for the Kanu family accused the Nigerian government of “state kidnapping” and said he was abducted by Nigerian officials in Kenya and taken to Nigeria against his will.

The Guardian stated that evidence at its disposal shows that Kanu entered Kenya this year on his British passport on a visa expiring in June, adding “His UK passport remains in Kenya.”

Kanu was not in possession of a Nigerian passport, his family said, and he has verbally renounced Nigerian citizenship in broadcasts.

“The abduction of a person from a foreign country with the aim of rendition to justice is illegal under international law” the medium stated.

Nigerian and Kenyan authorities have denied that Kenya was involved in the arrest, while the UK consulate in Nigeria has said it contacted Nigeria’s government concerning the case. UK officials did not immediately respond to requests from The Guardian for information.